2022 Event Archive

2022-01-08 Carolyn Driedger, USGS—Hazards from the Nevado del Ruiz and Mount Rainier volcanoes

The Lecture Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) and Mount Rainier (US) exist a hemisphere apart, but they both project similar hazards for communities downstream.  Central to their stories is the development and continued presence of weak and collapse-prone hydrothermally altered rock, and perennial covers of glacier ice and snow. Slopes of both volcanos are mantled by loose rock debris that can be remobilized to initiate lahars. At both volcanoes, five major glaciofluvial rivers flow down narrow valleys to lowland areas that support large human populations. More than a 150,000 persons live in areas at risk of lahars that could emanate from Rainier.  Thirty-six… Read more2022-01-08 Carolyn Driedger, USGS—Hazards from the Nevado del Ruiz and Mount Rainier volcanoes

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2022-02-19 Marli Miller, University of Oregon — Roadside Geology of Washington

The Lecture On Saturday February 19, geologist and photographer Marli Miller spoke about the geology of Oregon and Washington as seen along our federal and state highways as outlined in her recent Roadside Geology books.  With its spectacular mountain ranges, lush valleys and awesome rivers, the Pacific Northwest landscape offers an incredible geologic story grounded in continental accretion and mountain-building, magmatism, and glaciation. Beginning with the Crescent Terrane (Siletzia), the latest addition to North America, she described elements of continental accretion that form the underlying but diverse basement of the region, followed by a photographic “roadtrip” up the Columbia Gorge… Read more2022-02-19 Marli Miller, University of Oregon — Roadside Geology of Washington

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2022-04-02 Kim Juniper, Univ. of Victoria: The Battle for the Abyss

The Battle for the Abyss:  Mining, conservation, and bioprospecting interests square off on the deep sea The Lecture Nearly 60% of the surface of our planet is covered by more than 2000 m of water. The deep seabed is the largest and least explored ecological region on Earth. With no light for photosynthesis, this cold high-pressure environment is a food desert, with most organisms feeding on organic debris that sinks from the surface ocean. Yet, there are an estimated 500,000 or more species in the deep sea, many of which occur nowhere else. The abyss has seen relatively little disturbance… Read more2022-04-02 Kim Juniper, Univ. of Victoria: The Battle for the Abyss

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2022-05-14 George Mustoe, WWU Bellingham:  The Chuckanut—Not just another good brewpub

Washington’s fossil footprints—Tracking birds and beasts of a bygone era The Lecture The Chuckanut Formation is one of North America’s thickest sequences of non-marine sediment.  It was deposited by a meandering river that flowed westward across Washington at a time when the Cascade Range had not yet been created. The strata accumulated to a thickness of at least 6,000 meters (20,000 ft). The oldest beds were deposited in the late Paleocene, but most deposition occurred in the early Eocene. The warm early Cenozoic climate allowed subtropical rainforests to flourish. Abundant plant fossils in the Chuckanut include fronds from palms, tree… Read more2022-05-14 George Mustoe, WWU Bellingham:  The Chuckanut—Not just another good brewpub

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2022-07-08 Walk to the Rocks Field Trip

Walk to the Rocks:  Geology of Tamanowas  Rock and Peregrine’s Rock, Chimacum, WA The Trip—Lead by the QGS Rockstars On Friday, July 8, 2022, the QGS Rockstars (four of our geologists) will led a 4-mile, 4-hour hike (11AM—3PM) from HJ Carroll County Park near Chimacum to the Tamanowas Rock Sanctuary, then up on top of Tamanowas Ridge to see Peregrine’s Rock. The hike can be vigorous, steep, and rough in parts and is tailored to agile citizen scientists who are already knowledgeable about geologic principles and vocabulary. Subjects to werevdiscussed include the glacial history of the Quimper Peninsula, specifically Chimacum Valley, glacial erratics on the Peninsula, and the geology of the underlying… Read more2022-07-08 Walk to the Rocks Field Trip

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