Welcome to the Quimper Geological Society (QGS)

UPCOMING EVENTS

Our speaking events are on Saturdays at 4 pm and are announced by member email, local print and electronic bulletin boards. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, our sit-down lectures are cancelled indefinitely; instead the lectures are being presented via Zoom. Watch our schedule for updates and links to the lectures. In addition, we record these lectures for later viewing (see the Events > Recorded Events tab) on home page menu).

Click title or photo to see description of events and speakers background

 

2022-10-05 KPTZ Nature Now Interviews—Walk to the Rocks field trip

Nan Evans of KPTZ and local geologists, Jeff Tepper and Michael Machette, explore two significant rocky outcrops in Eastern Jefferson County – Tamanowas Rock and Peregrine Rocks, both just northwest of Chimacum.  The interview is for Nature Now, a weekly radio broadcast on KPTZ 91.9 MHz. Because Nan got so many interesting tidbits, the interview will be broadcast in two parts and each will be recorded as MP3s and be available if you can’t hear the broadcasts: Show #587: Broadcasts Oct. 5 at 12:30 PM, Oct. 7 at 5 PM, Oct. 8 at 12:30 PM Listen in to learn how… Read more2022-10-05 KPTZ Nature Now Interviews—Walk to the Rocks field trip

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2022-10-15 Erin Donaghy, Revisiting stratigraphy of the Eocene to Miocene sedimentary peripheral rocks on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

The Lecture: The role of oceanic plateau collision in the geologic development of the Olympic Peninsula: testing geologic connection between Wrangell-St. Elias (AK) and Olympic (WA) National Parks. The Pacific Northwest (PNW) has a long geologic history of seismic activity. Recent studies suggest the PNW experienced a collision ~50 million years ago (Ma, early Eocene) which resulted in an enormous oceanic plateau attaching itself to the west margin of the continent. That plateau is known fondly, as Siletzia. Erin Donaghy will discuss what occurred after the accretion of Siletzia. She will describe the interbedded siltstone and sandstone turbidites in the… Read more2022-10-15 Erin Donaghy, Revisiting stratigraphy of the Eocene to Miocene sedimentary peripheral rocks on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

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2022-11-12 Karl Wegmann, Recent advances in understanding the Lake Crescent fault

Earthquakes, Rock Avalanches, Displacement Waves, and Turbidites: The Amazing Holocene Sedimentary Record from Lake Crescent, Clallam County, Washington. The Lecture The Lake Creek–Boundary Creek fault zone lies below Lake Crescent, a deep, glacially carved lake on the north side of the Olympic Peninsula, west of Port Angeles. This fault zone includes a system of structures that reveals at least 56 kilometers (35 miles) of late Pleistocene to Holocene surface rupture. New data from the sediment cores taken from the lake’s bottom document four ruptures along the fault zone. Those seismic events triggered several large rockslides along the slopes adjacent to… Read more2022-11-12 Karl Wegmann, Recent advances in understanding the Lake Crescent fault

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2022-12-10 Marcia Bjornerud—Timefulness: How to think like a geologist can save the world

On Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022, Marcia Bjornerud, Professor of Geosciences at Lawrence University in Wisconsin, will share ideas from her book Timefulness:  How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World. The Lecture Developing and calibrating the geologic timescale — reconstructing Earth’s past from the raw rock record — is one of humanity’s greatest, but least appreciated, intellectual achievements.   But as a society, we are time illiterate, lacking a sense for the durations of the chapters in Earth’s history, the rates of change during previous intervals of climate instability, and the intrinsic timescales of ‘natural capital’ like groundwater systems.  This… Read more2022-12-10 Marcia Bjornerud—Timefulness: How to think like a geologist can save the world

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  Facebook group link…  Join our Facebook Group to see other events or interesting notes on the geology of our Pacific Northwest area.

ABOUT US

Our goal is to foster an understanding of Earth Science concepts by offering 5-6 illustrated lectures during the academic year and one or two summer field trips. We focus mainly, but not exclusively, on local and regional geologic features and issues (see yearly list under events). Membership and events are FREE and open to the public, although we gratefully accept donations to defray our expenses. QGS is an earth-science activity of the Jefferson Land Trust, which is located in Port Townsend, WA.  We are in our 10th year here on the Quimper Peninsula.

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